Kyushu Clash (Quarters 1 & 3)

Self-Guided Adventures

Classic

With any luck your home nation team will have emerged victorious from the pool stages and will be ready to take on the next challenge: the quarter-finals. You’ll already have your tickets, so we’ll plan all the details to make this a journey to remember.

In this whirlwind 7-night trip on the lesser trodden southwestern island of Kyushu, you’ll join legions of fans to cheer on your favourites at quarter-finals 1 and 3 in Oita Stadium. Either side of the rugby, take in the rich history, cuisine, and gorgeous scenery of Fukuoka and Nagasaki. You’ll also get a couple of nights in Osaka, the foodie capital of Japan, at the beginning and end of your trip.

Trip highlights

  • Join our exclusive rugby fan event in Fukuoka
  • Explore cosmopolitan Nagasaki and laid-back Fukuoka
  • Cheer on the quarter-final clashes in Oita
  • Take in the lush Kyushu scenery
  • Tuck into delicious Osaka street food
  • **Please note, none of our trips or tours contain official match tickets**

Trip fits with:

QF1: W Pool C v RU Pool D

Oita

Saturday 19 October

KO 16:15 (local time)

QF3: W Pool D v RU Pool C

Oita

Sunday 20 October

KO 16:15 (local time)

Trip essentials

Starts 15th October 2019

Ends 22nd October 2019

7 nights: from £1,990 (excl. intl. flights) per person

Trip code: QFSGA13

For more information:

Call us: 01179 927068

Matches & Times

Matches & Times

This itinerary is designed to get you to the right place at the right time for the following rugby matches.

Please note that match tickets are not included in this package.

Match

Host City

Stadium

Ticket Info

-

vs

-

Pool QF1

Oita

Sat 19th October 2019

KO 16:15 (local time)

Oita Stadium

Stadium info

-

vs

-

Pool QF3

Oita

Sun 20th October 2019

KO 16:15 (local time)

Oita Stadium

Stadium info

Day by Day

Day by Day

Journey off the regular tourist track to Kyushu where you can delve into Japan's cosmopolitan past in Nagasaki. Soak up the fun atmosphere of Fukuoka before taking in the all-important quarter-final clashes in Oita.

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Day 1 Osaka

Your adventure begins

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Day 1 Osaka

Yokoso, welcome to Japan! You’ll fly into Osaka Kansai International Airport and we’ll arrange a private car to whisk you in comfort to your hotel in central Osaka. You’ll have the rest of the day to do some exploring, try some of the local food, or relax to get over your jet lag.

Day 2-3 Nagasaki

Speed south on the bullet train

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Day 2-3 Nagasaki

You’ve probably heard all about Japan’s high speed bullet trains; now is your chance to ride on one. You’ll journey down to Nagasaki in Kyushu, Japan’s southwestern island that tends to be off the regular tourist track. Despite the tragic events of August 1945, Nagasaki retains its vibrant, cosmopolitan atmosphere and rich history. You’ll have plenty of time to explore this architecturally diverse city at your leisure.

Day 4-6 Fukuoka & Oita

Root for your team at the quarter-finals

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Day 4-6 Fukuoka & Oita

Laid-back Fukuoka will be your base for the next few nights, and you’re invited to attend our exclusive pre-match rugby party. We’ll arrange your transportation to and from the 43,000 capacity Oita Stadium where you’ll witness the best rugby in the world as the winners and runners-up of pools C & D battle it out for a spot in the semis. Will your team be advancing to the next stage? You’ll be right there to find out!

Day 7-8 Osaka

Round off your trip with Osakan cuisine

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Day 7-8 Osaka

Journey back to Osaka where you’ll have a final afternoon and evening to do a last lot of sightseeing and eating, before heading out to the airport for your flight home.

Map & Destinations

Map & Destinations

This itinerary is bookended by stays in Osaka, so you’ll need to book flights into and out of Osaka Kansai International Airport. From Osaka you’ll head down to Kyushu in time for the quarter-finals in Oita.

Osaka

Your adventure begins

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Osaka

Osaka is the concrete beating heart of the Kansai region – Japan’s second biggest industrial area with an output rivalling that of Australia. This is modern Japan writ large: massive crowds, huge department stores, karaoke boxes, bars, restaurants and clubs one on top of the other.

Osaka has all the galleries and museums you’d expect of a large city – but the best way to experience the character of the place is on the street and in the buzzing, larger-than-life entertainment quarters. Osaka has a reputation for a work-hard-play-hard mentality, and from about 6pm the streets are alive with businessmen, shop workers and students all out to relax and have a good time. Youth culture is everywhere you turn, with video game parlours and karaoke centres lining the covered arcades.

Most importantly, Osaka is one of the best places to try Japanese food – whether it’s octopus balls from a street-side stand, okonomiyaki savoury pancakes (a regional speciality), or some of best sushi in the world. The streets around Nanba and Dotonbori are jam-packed with a dazzling array of superb eateries for all budgets.

Osaka is located in the Kansai region of Japan’s main island, close to many of Japan’s most interesting destinations such as Kyoto and Nara, and with excellent transport links across the country.

Nagasaki

Speed south on the bullet train

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Nagasaki

Built on the shores of a natural bay, Nagasaki’s rich history as a trading port is reflected in its local culture, cosmopolitan atmosphere, and the diversity of its architecture. This is a city that deserves to be renowned for a lot more than the atomic bomb.

Japan’s first contact with the West took place in Nagasaki with the arrival of missionaries and traders from Portugal and the Netherlands who were confined to the small enclave of Dejima (“Exit Island”), a fan-shaped artificial island in the bay. This long history of international influence is reflected in Nagasaki’s unusually diverse architecture – with Japanese shrines rubbing shoulders with Chinese temples and Western colonial-style houses.

One of the most interesting parts of Nagasaki is Glover Garden, another remnant of Nagasaki’s cosmopolitan past. Named after the influential Scottish entrepreneur Thomas Glover, the park contains various colonial-style mansions that were home to Western settlers in the second half of the 19th century, and is now open to the public as a fascinating open-air museum.

With its easy-to-use tram system and attractive vintage streetcars, Nagasaki is a joy to explore. Blessed with a cosmopolitan and relaxed atmosphere, the city is remembered by many visitors as one of the most pleasant experiences in all Japan. To cap off your visit, we highly recommend an evening cable car trip to the top of Mount Inasa-yama for a spectacular night-time panorama over the city.

Fukuoka

Root for your team at the quarter-finals

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Fukuoka

Fukuoka is a laid-back, youthful, fun-loving city with good shopping, live music, a major baseball team and great restaurants. Due to its location Fukuoka is a great starting point for exploring the rest of Kyushu.

Over the past ten years Fukuoka, the biggest city on Kyushu, has transformed itself into one of the most cosmopolitan and international cities in Japan. Although it is not as big as Tokyo or Osaka, it still manages to possess the same vibrant buzz. Because of its proximity to South Korea and the rest of eastern Asia, the city has always been an important port with an international flavour. It is thought to be where tea and Buddhism were first introduced to Japan.

Fukuoka, however, is not a place to visit for traditional Japanese culture. There are a few important temples, shrines and museums but it’s the excesses of modern urban life that draw people to the city. The downtown area of Tenjin is packed full of shops, restaurants, karaoke booths and bars and attacks all of the senses with neon lights, music, crowds of people and the smell of ramen drifting from yatai stalls.

‘Yatai’ are mobile food stands set up in the early evening on pedestrian walkways and cleared away by the early hours. The ones in Fukuoka are famous for selling a pork broth noodle soup known as tonkotsu ramen. The stalls are usually frequented by salary men having a few drinks with their colleagues on their way home from work.

Accommodation

Accommodation

Please note that we now have limited accommodation availability at Classic (three star) grade, but we do have Superior (four star) packages available, so please get in touch.

 

This itinerary includes mid-range Western-style hotels (approximately three star). Breakfast is included every day.

Osaka: Candeo Hotels Osaka Nanba

Nagasaki: New Nagasaki Hotel

Fukuoka: Monte Hermana Fukuoka

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